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The Daily

The New York Times

News, Daily News

4.597.8K Ratings

Overview

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro and Sabrina Tavernise. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m. Listen to this podcast in New York Times Audio, our new iOS app for news subscribers. Download now at nytimes.com/audioapp

2175 Episodes

Inside Trump’s Search for a Vice President

The makeup of the 2024 presidential race has felt inevitable from the start — with one notable exception: Donald J. Trump’s choice of a running mate. Michael Bender, a political correspondent for The Times, explains why Mr. Trump’s requirements in a No. 2 are very different this time round than they were eight years ago.

Transcribed - Published: 13 June 2024

The Criminal Conviction of Hunter Biden

A jury on Tuesday found Hunter Biden, President Biden’s son, guilty of three felonies related to the purchase of a gun at one of the low points of his troubled life. Katie Rogers, a White House correspondent for The Times, explains what the verdict could mean for the 2024 presidential race.

Transcribed - Published: 12 June 2024

Biden’s Hard-Line Effort to Close the Border

Last week, President Biden announced one of the most restrictive immigration policies by a Democratic incumbent in decades, effectively barring migrants crossing the southern border from seeking asylum in the United States.Zolan Kanno-Youngs, a White House correspondent for The Times, explains the thinking behind the move.

Transcribed - Published: 11 June 2024

The Rise and Fall of Congestion Pricing in New York

On Wednesday, Gov. Kathy Hochul of New York announced that she was indefinitely halting a project that had been decades in the making: congestion pricing in Manhattan’s core business district. Ana Ley, who covers mass transit in New York City, and Grace Ashford, who covers politics in New York, discuss why New York hit the brakes on congestion pricing.

Transcribed - Published: 10 June 2024

'Animal,' Episode 2: Puffins

In a broken world, what can we gain by looking another animal in the eye? "Animal" is a six-part, round-the-world journey in search of an answer. In Episode 2, the writer Sam Anderson travels to Iceland to rescue baby puffins — which are called, adorably, pufflings. For more on "Animal," visit nytimes.com/animal.

Transcribed - Published: 9 June 2024

'The Interview': The Darker Side of Julia Louis-Dreyfus

The actress is taking on serious roles, trying to overcome self-doubt and sharing more about her personal life — but she’s not done being funny.

Transcribed - Published: 8 June 2024

Real Teenagers, Fake Nudes: The Rise of Deepfakes in American Schools

Warning: this episode contains strong language, descriptions of explicit content and sexual harassment A disturbing new problem is sweeping American schools: Students are using artificial intelligence to create sexually explicit images of their classmates and then share them without the person depicted even knowing. Natasha Singer, who covers technology, business and society for The Times, discusses the rise of deepfake nudes and one girl's fight to stop them. Guest: Natasha Singer, a reporter covering technology, business and society for The New York Times.

Transcribed - Published: 7 June 2024

The Fight Over the Next Pandemic

At the height of the Covid pandemic, nearly 200 countries started negotiating a plan to ensure they would do better when the next pandemic inevitably arrived. Their deadline for that plan was last week. Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter for The Times, explains why, so far, the negotiations have failed. Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter for The New York Times.

Transcribed - Published: 6 June 2024

Biden’s Push to End the War in Gaza

In an unexpected speech last week, President Biden revealed the details of a secret proposal intended to end the war in Gaza. Perhaps the most surprising thing was where that proposal had come from. Isabel Kershner, a reporter for The Times in Jerusalem, explains Mr. Biden’s gambit and the difficult choice it presents for Israel’s leader, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Guest: Isabel Kershner, who covers Israeli and Palestinian affairs for The New York Times.

Transcribed - Published: 5 June 2024

A Conversation With President Zelensky

Five years ago, a TV personality and comedian, Volodymyr Zelensky, won the presidency in Ukraine in a landslide victory. When Russia launched a full-scale invasion of the country three years later, he faced the biggest challenge of his presidency and of his life. Despite initial success beating back one of the world’s largest armies, the tide has turned against him. Andrew E. Kramer, the Kyiv bureau chief for The Times, sat down with Mr. Zelensky to discuss the war, and how it might end. Guest: Andrew E. Kramer, the Kyiv bureau chief for The New York Times.

Transcribed - Published: 4 June 2024

How Trump’s Conviction Could Reshape the Election

Last week, Donald J. Trump became the first U.S. former president to be convicted of a crime when a jury found that he had falsified business records to conceal a sex scandal. Maggie Haberman, a senior political correspondent for The Times, and Reid J. Epstein, who also covers politics, discuss how the conviction might shape the remaining months of the presidential race. Guest: Nate Cohn, who is the chief political analyst for The New York Times. Maggie Haberman, a senior political correspondent for The New York Times. Reid J. Epstein, who covers politics for The New York Times.

Transcribed - Published: 3 June 2024

Introducing ‘Animal’: Walnut

In a broken world, what can we gain by looking another animal in the eye? "Animal" is a six-part, round-the-world journey in search of an answer. Join the writer Sam Anderson on Episode 1. For more on "Animal," visit nytimes.com/animal.

Transcribed - Published: 2 June 2024

'The Interview': Richard Linklater Sees the Killer Inside Us All

David Marchese talks to the acclaimed director about his new film “Hit Man” and life’s big questions.

Transcribed - Published: 1 June 2024

Guilty

Former President Donald J. Trump has become the first American president to be declared a felon. A Manhattan jury found that he had falsified business records to conceal a sex scandal that could have hindered his 2016 campaign for the White House. Jonah Bromwich, who has been covering the hush-money trial for The Times, was in the room.

Transcribed - Published: 31 May 2024

The Government Takes On Ticketmaster

Over recent years, few companies have provoked more anger among music fans than Ticketmaster. Last week, the Department of Justice announced it was taking the business to court. David McCabe, who covers technology policy for The Times, explains how the case could reshape America’s multibillion-dollar live music industry.

Transcribed - Published: 30 May 2024

The Closing Arguments in the Trump Trial

On Tuesday, lawyers for the prosecution and the defense delivered their final arguments to the jury in the criminal case of The People of the State of New York v. Donald J. Trump. Jonah Bromwich, one of the lead reporters covering the trial for The Times, was there.

Transcribed - Published: 29 May 2024

The Alitos and Their Flags

The discovery that an upside-down American flag — a symbol adopted by the campaign to overturn the 2020 election result — had flown at the home of Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. elicited concerns from politicians, legal scholars and others. And then came news of a second flag. Jodi Kantor, the Times reporter who broke the stories, discusses the saga.

Transcribed - Published: 28 May 2024

'The Interview': Ted Sarandos’s Plan to Get You to Binge Even More

Netflix won the streaming battle, but the war for your attention isn’t over.

Transcribed - Published: 25 May 2024

Whales Have an Alphabet

Ever since the discovery of whale songs almost 60 years ago, scientists have been trying to decipher the lyrics. But sperm whales don’t produce the eerie melodies sung by humpback whales, sounds that became a sensation in the 1960s. Instead, sperm whales rattle off clicks that sound like a cross between Morse code and a creaking door.

Transcribed - Published: 24 May 2024

I.C.C. Prosecutor Requests Warrants for Israeli and Hamas Leaders

This week, Karim Khan, the top prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, requested arrest warrants for Israel’s prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, and the country’s defense minister, Yoav Gallant. Patrick Kingsley, the Times’s bureau chief in Jerusalem, explains why this may set up a possible showdown between the court and Israel with its biggest ally, the United States.

Transcribed - Published: 23 May 2024

Biden’s Open War On Hidden Fees

The Biden administration is trying to crack down on sneaky fees charged by hotels, rental cars, internet providers and more. Jim Tankersley, a White House correspondent, explains why the effort is doubling as a war against something else that Biden is finding much harder to defeat. Guest: Jim Tankersley, who covers economic policy at the White House for The New York Times

Transcribed - Published: 22 May 2024

The Crypto Comeback

This month, customers of FTX — Sam Bankman-Fried’s cryptocurrency exchange, which collapsed in 2022 — were told that they would get their money back, with interest. David Yaffe-Bellany, our technology reporter, explains what was behind this change in fortune and what it says about the improbable resurgence of crypto. Guest: David Yaffe-Bellany, a technology reporter for The New York Times, covering the crypto industry from San Francisco.

Transcribed - Published: 21 May 2024

Was the 401(k) a Mistake?

The first generation to be fully reliant on 401(k) plans is now starting to retire. As that happens, it is becoming clear just how broken the system is. Michael Steinberger, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine, explains.

Transcribed - Published: 20 May 2024

The Sunday Read: ‘Why Did This Guy Put a Song About Me on Spotify?’

Have you heard the song “Brett Martin, You a Nice Man, Yes”? Probably not. On Spotify, “Brett Martin, You a Nice Man, Yes” has not yet accumulated enough streams to even register a tally. Even Brett Martin, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and the titular Nice Man, didn’t hear the 1 minute 14 second song until last summer, a full 11 years after it was uploaded by an artist credited as Papa Razzi and the Photogs. When Martin stumbled on “Brett Martin, You a Nice Man, Yes,” he naturally assumed it was about a different, more famous Brett Martin: perhaps Brett Martin, the left-handed reliever who until recently played for the Texas Rangers; or Brett Martin, the legendary Australian squash player; or even Clara Brett Martin, the Canadian who in 1897 became the British Empire’s first female lawyer. Only when the singer began referencing details of stories that he made for public radio’s “This American Life” almost 20 years ago did he realize the song was actually about him. The song ended, “I really like you/Will you be my friend?/Will you call me on the phone?” Then it gave a phone number, with a New Hampshire area code. So, he called.

Transcribed - Published: 19 May 2024

'The Interview': Ayana Elizabeth Johnson Has an Antidote to Our Climate Delusions

The scientist talks to David Marchese about how to overcome the “soft” climate denial that keeps us buying junk.

Transcribed - Published: 18 May 2024

The Campus Protesters Explain Themselves

This episode contains explicit language. Over recent months, protests over the war in Gaza have rocked college campuses across the United States. As students graduate and go home for the summer, three joined “The Daily” to discuss why they got involved, what they wanted to say and how they ended up facing off against each other.

Transcribed - Published: 17 May 2024

The Make-or-Break Testimony of Michael Cohen

This episode contains explicit language. Michael Cohen, Donald J. Trump’s former lawyer and fixer, took the stand in the former president’s hush-money trial. Jonah E. Bromwich, a criminal justice reporter, discusses how Mr. Cohen could cause problems for Mr. Trump himself.

Transcribed - Published: 16 May 2024

The Possible Collapse of the U.S. Home Insurance System

Across the United States, more frequent extreme weather is starting to cause the home insurance market to buckle, even for those who have paid their premiums dutifully year after year. Christopher Flavelle, a climate reporter, discusses a Times investigation into one of the most consequential effects of the changes.

Transcribed - Published: 15 May 2024

Voters Want Change. In Our Poll, They See It in Trump.

The latest Times polling shows the extent of the challenge that President Biden faces and the strengths that Donald J. Trump retains. A yearning for change — as well as discontent over the economy and the war in Gaza among young, Black and Hispanic voters — may lie behind both. Nate Cohn, our chief political analyst, explains the surveys: New York Times/Siena College polls of Michigan, Wisconsin, Georgia, Nevada and Arizona, and the inaugural Times/Philadelphia Inquirer/Siena poll in Pennsylvania.

Transcribed - Published: 14 May 2024

How Biden Adopted Trump’s Trade War With China

Donald Trump upended decades of American policy when he started a trade war with China. Many thought that President Biden would reverse those policies. Instead, he’s stepping them up. Jim Tankersley, who covers economic policy at the White House, explains.

Transcribed - Published: 13 May 2024

Revisiting 'The Mother Who Changed: A Story of Dementia'

Earlier this year, we shared the story of one family’s dispute over a loved one with dementia. That story, originally reported in The New York Times Magazine by Katie Engelhart, won the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing this past week. Today, we're revisiting Katie’s story – and the question at the heart of it: When cognitive decline changes people, should we respect their new desires?

Transcribed - Published: 12 May 2024

'The Interview': Charlamagne Tha God Won’t Take Sides

The radio host talks to Lulu Garcia-Navarro about how he plans to wield his considerable political influence during this election cycle.

Transcribed - Published: 11 May 2024

Stormy Daniels Takes The Stand

This episode contains descriptions of an alleged sexual liaison. What happened when Stormy Daniels took the stand for eight hours in the first criminal trial of former President Donald J. Trump? Jonah Bromwich, one of the lead reporters covering the trial for The Times, was in the room.

Transcribed - Published: 10 May 2024

One Strongman, One Billion Voters, and the Future of India

India is in the midst of a national election and its prime minister, Narendra Modi, is running to extend his 10 years in power. Mr. Modi has become one of the most consequential leaders in India’s history, while also drawing criticism for anti-democratic practices and charges of religious persecution. Mujib Mashal, the South Asia bureau chief for The New York Times, discusses what we might see from Mr. Modi in a third term. Guest: Mujib Mashal, the South Asia bureau chief for The New York Times.

Transcribed - Published: 9 May 2024

A Plan to Remake the Middle East

If and when Israel and Hamas reach a deal for a cease-fire, the United States will immediately turn to a different set of negotiations over a grand diplomatic bargain that it believes could rebuild Gaza and remake the Middle East. Michael Crowley, who covers the State Department and U.S. foreign policy for The Times, explains why those involved in this plan believe they have so little time left to get it done.

Transcribed - Published: 8 May 2024

How Changing Ocean Temperatures Could Upend Life on Earth

While many of the effects of climate change, including heat waves, droughts and wildfires, are already with us, some of the most alarming consequences are hiding beneath the surface of the ocean. David Gelles and Raymond Zhong, who both cover climate for The New York Times, explain just how close we might be to a tipping point.

Transcribed - Published: 7 May 2024

R.F.K. Jr.’s Battle to Get on the Ballot

As Robert F. Kennedy Jr. tries to get on the presidential ballot in all 50 states, he’s confronting fierce resistance from his opponents. Rebecca Davis O’Brien, who covers campaign finance and money in U.S. elections for The New York Times, discusses the high-stakes battle playing out behind the scenes.

Transcribed - Published: 6 May 2024

'The Interview': Marlon Wayans Lost Nearly 60 Loved Ones. Comedy Saved Him.

The comedian talks to David Marchese on becoming a different person after unimaginable loss.

Transcribed - Published: 4 May 2024

The Protesters and the President

Warning: this episode contains strong language. Over the past week, students at dozens of universities held demonstrations, set up encampments and, at times, seized academic buildings. In response, administrators at many of those colleges decided to crack down and called in the local police to detain and arrest demonstrators. As of Thursday, the police had arrested 2,000 people across more than 40 campuses, a situation so startling that President Biden could no longer ignore it. Jonathan Wolfe, who has been covering the student protests for The Times, and Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent, discuss the history-making week. Guest: Jonathan Wolfe, a senior staff editor on the newsletters team at The New York Times. Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times covering President Biden and his administration.

Transcribed - Published: 3 May 2024

Biden Loosens Up on Weed

For half a century, the federal government has treated marijuana as one of the more dangerous drugs in the United States. On Tuesday, the Biden administration signaled a significant shift in approach. Zolan Kanno-Youngs, a White House correspondent for The Times, explains how big an impact the proposed changes could have. Guest: Zolan Kanno-Youngs, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.

Transcribed - Published: 2 May 2024

The New Abortion Fight Before the Supreme Court

But in Washington, the Biden administration is challenging one of those bans in a case that is now before the Supreme Court, arguing that Idaho’s strict rules violate a federal law on emergency medical treatment. Pam Belluck, a health and science reporter at The Times, and Abbie VanSickle, who covers the Supreme Court, explain how the federal law, known as EMTALA, relates to abortion, and how the case could reverberate beyond Idaho. Guests: Pam Belluck, a health and science reporter for The New York Times. Abbie VanSickle, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times.

Transcribed - Published: 1 May 2024

The Secret Push That Could Ban TikTok

American lawmakers have tried for years to ban TikTok, concerned that the video app’s links to China pose a national security risk. Sapna Maheshwari, a technology reporter for The Times, explains the behind-the-scenes push to rein in TikTok and discusses what a ban could mean for the app’s 170 million users in the United States. Guest: Sapna Maheshwari, who covers TikTok, technology and emerging media companies for The New York Times.

Transcribed - Published: 30 April 2024

Trump 2.0: What a Second Trump Presidency Would Bring

In a special series leading up to Election Day, “The Daily” will explore what a second Trump presidency would look like, and what it could mean for American democracy. In the first part, we will look at Tump’s plan for a second term. On the campaign trail, Trump has outlined a vision that is far more radical, vindictive and unchecked than his first one. Jonathan Swan and Maggie Haberman, political correspondents for The Times, and Charlie Savage, who covers national security, have found that behind Trump’s rhetoric is a highly coordinated plan, to make his vision a reality. Guest: Jonathan Swan, who covers politics and Donald Trump’s presidential campaign for The New York Times. Maggie Haberman, a senior political correspondent for The New York Times. Charlie Savage, who covers national security and legal policy for The New York Times.

Transcribed - Published: 29 April 2024

Introducing ‘The Interview’: Yair Lapid Says the World Misunderstands Israel

Frustrated at the growing protest movement, the opposition leader defends his country’s “existential” war.

Transcribed - Published: 28 April 2024

Introducing ‘The Interview’: Anne Hathaway Is Done Trying to Please

On the debut of ’The Interview,' the actress talks to David Marchese about learning to let go of other people’s opinions.

Transcribed - Published: 27 April 2024

Harvey Weinstein Conviction Thrown Out

When the Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein was convicted of sex crimes four years ago, it was celebrated as a watershed moment for the #MeToo movement. Yesterday, New York’s highest court of appeals overturned that conviction. Jodi Kantor, one of the reporters who broke the story of the abuse allegations against Mr. Weinstein in 2017, explains what this ruling means for him and for #MeToo. Guest: Jodi Kantor, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.

Transcribed - Published: 26 April 2024

The Crackdown on Student Protesters

Columbia University has become the epicenter of a growing showdown between student protesters, college administrators and Congress over the war in Gaza and the limits of free speech. Nicholas Fandos, who covers New York politics and government for The Times, walks us through the intense week at the university. And Isabella Ramírez, the editor in chief of Columbia’s undergraduate newspaper, explains what it has all looked like to a student on campus. Guest: Nicholas Fandos, who covers New York politics and government for The New York Times Isabella Ramírez, editor in chief of the Columbia Daily Spectator

Transcribed - Published: 25 April 2024

Is $60 Billion Enough to Save Ukraine?

Lawmakers approved a giant new tranche of support for Ukraine late last night after a tortured passage through the U.S. Congress, where it was nearly derailed by right-wing resistance in the House. Marc Santora, a Times reporter in Ukraine’s capital, Kyiv, explains what effect the money could have, given Ukraine’s increasing desperation on the battlefield. Guest: Marc Santora, who covers Ukraine for The New York Times.

Transcribed - Published: 24 April 2024

A Salacious Conspiracy or Just 34 Pieces of Paper?

The prosecution and the defense both opened their cases on Monday in the first criminal trial of Donald Trump. Jonah Bromwich, who watched from inside the courtroom, walks us through the arguments. Guest: Jonah E. Bromwich, a reporter for The New York Times covering criminal justice in New York.

Transcribed - Published: 23 April 2024

The Evolving Danger of the New Bird Flu

The outbreak of bird flu currently tearing through the nation’s poultry is the worst in U.S. history. Scientists say it is now spreading beyond farms into places and species it has never been before. Emily Anthes, a science reporter for The Times, explains. Guest: Emily Anthes, a science reporter for The New York Times.

Transcribed - Published: 22 April 2024

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